7 December 2017
Media Release - #2017021, 2017

Appointment of Commissioner to the Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Commission

I am pleased to announce the Hon Dr Gary Johns has been appointed as the full-time Commissioner of the Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Commission (ACNC) for a five-year period.

The ACNC is the national regulator of charities, established by the Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Commission Act 2012. The ACNC has the responsibility of maintaining, protecting and enhancing public trust and confidence in the sector, supporting the accountability and transparency of the sector, supporting and sustaining a robust, vibrant, independent and innovative sector, and promoting the reduction of unnecessary regulatory obligations.

Dr Johns is a Director of the Australian Institute for Progress and an Adjunct Professor at the Queensland University of Technology Business School.

Dr Johns is a respected leader in the charities and not-for-profits sector, having served as a member of the Prime Minister’s Community Business Partnership, advising the Government on practical strategies to foster a culture of philanthropic giving, volunteering and investment in Australia. He is also a columnist to The Australian, and has authored a number of books on the charities and not-for-profits sector.

He also has wide-ranging experience in regulation, public service and policy, serving as an Associate Commissioner of the Productivity Commission, a senior consultant at ACIL Tasman and an Associate Professor at the Australian Catholic University.

Dr Johns served in the House of Representatives from 1987-1996, representing the electorate of Petrie. He held a number of roles in the Keating Government, including Parliamentary Secretary to the Deputy Prime Minister, Parliamentary Secretary to the Treasurer, Special Minister of State and Assistant Minister for Industrial Relations.

He holds a Bachelor of Economics and Master of Arts from Monash University, a PhD in Political Science from the University of Queensland, and received the Fulbright Professional Award in Australian-United States Alliance Studies from Georgetown University. He was also received the Centenary Medal for ‘service to Australian society through the advancement of economic, social and political issues’.

I congratulate Dr Johns on his appointment and trust that he will make a valuable contribution to the regulatory oversight of the sector.